CSS Confirms First Case of Antibiotic Resistant KPC Bacteria in David

CSS Confirms First Case of Antibiotic Resistant KPC Bacteria in David, Panama

Monday, September 12 2011 @ 11:14 AM COT
Contributed by: Don Winner
Views: 70
The Director of Medical Services of the Social Security Fund, Javier Diaz, said on the channel 2 TVN morning news program today the Gorgas Memorial Institute has confirmed a patient hospitalized in David has tested positive for the antibiotic resistant Klebsiella Pneumoniae Carbapenemases (KPC) bacteria in Panama. Diaz explained this patient is an Indian who was hospitalized for a severe lung problem, who was given treatment against bacteria, which was effective against the other infections but not against the KPC bacteria. Diaz said this patient is in isolation with contact precautions, because KPC is spread by contact. Therefore, he argued that carriers of the disease who show no outward signs of infection should also be isolated to keep them from infecting others. However he said those who have tested as positive for the KPC bacteria, but who are not sick, are not being counted as KPC cases. Diaz said so far the Social Security Fund has managed 78 patients with active KPC infections in the Metropolitan Hospital Complex, and of those there have been 45 deaths – equivalent to a mortality rate greater than 50%. (Editor’s comment – it’s exactly 57.69%). Diaz said of the 78 patients with an active KPC infection, 18 have eliminated the bacteria and are considered cured. Another 15 are still being treated.
Editor’s Comment: Wow. This kind of information is exactly why the Social Security Fund in Panama did not want to make their handling of this crisis public. A mortality rate of 57.69% for KPC infections seems high, compared to the available literature. Here’s one document showing a mortality rate of 27% in Greece. Here’s another article describing mortality rates between 24% to 35%, depending on the therapy used. This article talks about KPC in Brazil, where mortality rates were 35% to 40%. So, as expected, Panama’s response to the KPC crisis has resulted in less than stellar (bottom of the barrel) results in saving the lives of those who were infected with the bacteria. And when did most of these deaths occur? Before the story broke in the news. Before the Social Security Fund got outside help and advice. Before they started adequately managing the crisis response. And what’s worse, the KPC mortality rate in Panama is likely to continue to rise. Of the 78 infected, only 18 are out of the woods, which appears to be an exceptionally sub-par performance on this particular playing field. And what’s more, it’s apparently spreading.

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